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September 2021

Rosanna Warren, Max Jacob: A Life in Art and Letters

September 11 from 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Grace Place, 637 S. Dearborn St.
Chicago, 60605
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Rosanna Warren was born in Fairfield, Connecticut, to a pair of writers: Robert Penn Warren, a major poet and novelist, and Eleanor Clark, a prize-winning author of criticism, fiction, and travel books. She earned her BA in painting from Yale University and an MA from the Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University. Warren is the Hanna Holborn Gray Distinguished Service Professor in the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. She has also taught at Vanderbilt University and…

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Kristy Nabhan-Warren, Meatpacking in America: How Migration, Work, and Faith Divide the Heartland

September 11 from 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Grace Place, 637 S. Dearborn St.
Chicago, 60605
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Kristy Nabhan-Warren is Professor and V.O. and Elizabeth Kahl Figge Chair of Catholic Studies at The University of Iowa in the Department of Religious Studies. Her research and books focus on U.S. Latina/x/o Catholics in the United States, and include The Virgin of El Barrio: Marian Apparitions, Catholic Evangelizing, and Mexican-American Activism (New York: New York University Press, 2005), Cursillos in America: Catholics, Protestants, and Fourth-Day Spirituality (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2013), and Américan Woman: The…

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Marcia Chatelain, Franchise: The Golden Arches in Black America in conversation with Elizabeth Taylor

September 11 from 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
C-Span Stage, 731 S. Plymouth Ct
Chicago, IL 60605 United States
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Marcia Chatelain is a professor of history and African American studies at Georgetown University, and is a leading public voice on the history of race, education, and food culture. The author of South Side Girls, Chatelain lives in Washington, DC.

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Amy Stanley, Stranger in the Shogun’s City: A Japanese Woman and Her World in conversation with Deborah Cohen

September 11 from 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
C-Span Stage, 731 S. Plymouth Ct
Chicago, IL 60605 United States
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Amy Stanley is a Professor of History at Northwestern University. Her book, Stranger in the Shogun's City: A Japanese Woman and Her World (Scribner, 2020), won the National Book Critics' Circle Award in Biography and PEN/America Jacqueline Bograd Weld Award in Biography and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Biography. Raised in Louisville, Kentucky, Deborah Cohen was educated at Harvard (BA) and Berkeley (Ph.D.).  She is Peter B. Ritzma Professor of Humanities and Professor of History at Northwestern…

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Rafia Zakaria, Against White Feminism

September 11 from 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Grace Place, 637 S. Dearborn St.
Chicago, 60605
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Rafia Zakaria is author of AGAINST WHITE FEMINISM and The Upstairs Wife: An Intimate History of Pakistan, Veil, and many essays for the Guardian, CNN, and the New York Times Book Review. She is a regular columnist for Dawn in Pakistan and The Baffler in the United States.

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Koa Beck, White Feminism: From the Suffragettes to influencers and Who They Leave Behind in conversation with Natalie Moore

September 11 from 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
AWM/Joseph and Bessie Feinberg Foundation Stage, 47 W. Polk Street
Chicago, IL 60605 United States
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Koa Beck is the former editor-in-chief of Jezebel. Previously, she was the executive editor at Vogue.com and the senior features editor at MarieClaire.com. Her writing has appeared in TIME, The Atlantic, The Globe and Mail, The Guardian, and Esquire, among others. She lives in Los Angeles with her wife. Natalie Moore (MSJ99) covers segregation and inequality for WBEZ, Chicago’s NPR affiliate. Her enterprise reporting has tackled race, housing, economic development, food injustice and violence. Moore’s work has been broadcast on…

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Elly Fishman, Refugee High: Coming of Age in America in conversation with Meha Ahmad

September 11 from 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
C-Span Stage, 731 S. Plymouth Ct
Chicago, IL 60605 United States
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Elly Fishman worked as a senior editor and writer at Chicago magazine. Her features have won numerous awards including a City Regional Magazine Award for her article “Welcome to Refugee High,” her first report on the students and faculty at Chicago’s Roger C. Sullivan High School. Refugee High: Coming of Age in America (The New Press) is based on the article, and won the prestigious Studs and Ida Terkel Prize for a first book in the public interest. A Chicago…

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Stump Connolly, I Told You So! Donald Trump: The Awful Years in conversation with Rachel Greenwald-Smith and Eli J. Finkel

September 11 from 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Program Stage, 41 W Ida B. Wells Dr.
Chicago, 60605 United States
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Been there, done that. How many political reporters can say that? Stump’s been gassed at the ’68 Democratic convention in Chicago, hung with Hunter Thompson in Wisconsin in ’72, spent the ’92 convention in New York inside Clinton’s command and control trailer and pioneered internet political coverage in ’96 as Stump Connolly, chief political correspondent of The Week Behind.  "I Told You So!" is his latest collection of columns about Donald Trump, the Awful Years. It opens in 2012 with…

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Rachel Greenwald-Smith, On Compromise in conversation with Stump Connolly and Eli J. Finkel

September 11 from 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Program Stage, 41 W Ida B. Wells Dr.
Chicago, 60605 United States
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Rachel Greenwald Smith is the author of On Compromise: Art, Politics, and the Fate of an American Ideal and Affect and American Literature in the Age of Neoliberalism. She teaches at Saint Louis University. Eli Finkel -- author of the bestselling book The All-Or-Nothing Marriage: How the Best Marriages Work -- is a professor at Northwestern University, where he has appointments in the psychology department and the Kellogg School of Management. He studies romantic relationships and American politics. In his…

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Wyatt Williams, Springer Mountain: Meditations on Killing and Eating

September 12 from 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Center Stage, 632 S. Dearborn Street
Chicago, IL 60605 United States
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Wyatt Williams is the author of Springer Mountain: Meditations on Killing and Eating. His essays have been published by Harper's, The New York Times Magazine, Oxford American, The Believer, and The Paris Review.

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Adam Goodman: The Deportation Machine: America’s Long History of Expelling Immigrants

September 12 from 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Center Stage, 632 S. Dearborn Street
Chicago, IL 60605 United States
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Adam Goodman teaches in the Department of History and the Latin American and Latino Studies Program at the University of Illinois Chicago. Twitter @adamsigoodman

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Joe Meno, Between Everything and Nothing: The Journey of Seidu Mohammed and Razak Iyal and the Quest for Asylum

September 12 from 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Center Stage, 632 S. Dearborn Street
Chicago, IL 60605 United States
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Joe Meno is a writer and cultural journalist who lives in Chicago. A winner of the Nelson Algren Literary Award, a Pushcart Prize, a Great Lakes Book Award, and a finalist for the Story Prize, he is the author of seven novels, Marvel and a Wonder, Office Girl, The Great Perhaps, The Boy Detective Fails, Hairstyles of the Damned, How the Hula Girl Sings,  and Tender as Hellfire. He was a contributing editor to Punk Planet, the seminal underground arts and politics magazine. His non-fiction has…

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Geraldo Cadava, The Hispanic Republican: The Shaping of an American Political Identity, from Nixon to Trump moderated by Michael Puente

September 12 from 10:00 am - 11:00 am
C-Span Stage, 731 S. Plymouth Ct
Chicago, IL 60605 United States
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Geraldo Cadava is a professor of History and Latina and Latino Studies at Northwestern University. He received a Ph.D. in History from Yale University in 2008, and he received a B.A., also in History, from Dartmouth College in 2000. His areas of expertise are Latino History, the United States-Mexico Borderlands, Latin American immigration to the United States, and American politics. He is the author of two books. The Hispanic Republican: The Shaping of An American Political Identity, from Nixon to…

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Dawn Turner In Conversation with the Rev. Amity Carrubba of Grace Episcopal Church

September 12 from 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Grace Place, 637 S. Dearborn St.
Chicago, 60605
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Chicago journalist and novelist Dawn Turner, whose piercing and inspiring new book Three Girls in Bronzeville: A Uniquely American Memoir of Race, Fate, and Sisterhood has been named one of “The Best Books to Read This Fall” by Vogue Magazine, sits “in conversation” with the Rev. Amity Carrubba at 11 a.m. Sunday in Grace Episcopal Church’s award-winning loft sanctuary. They’ll discuss the powerful role family, faith and friendship play in shaping the tragedies and triumphs that often color the African…

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Reuben Jonathan Miller, Halfway Home: Race, Punishment, and the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration Moderated by Alex Kotlowitz

September 12 from 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
C-Span Stage, 731 S. Plymouth Ct
Chicago, IL 60605 United States
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Reuben Jonathan Miller is a sociologist, criminologist and a social worker who teaches at the University of Chicago in the School of Social Service Administration where he studies and writes about race, democracy, and the social life of the city. He has been a member at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton New Jersey, a fellow at the New America Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation, and a visiting scholar at the University of Texas at Austin and Dartmouth College.…

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Dawn Turner In Conversation with the Rev. Amity Carrubba of Grace Episcopal Church

September 12 from 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Chicago journalist and novelist Dawn Turner, whose piercing and inspiring new book Three Girls in Bronzeville: A Uniquely American Memoir of Race, Fate, and Sisterhood has been named one of “The Best Books to Read This Fall” by Vogue Magazine, sits “in conversation” with the Rev. Amity Carrubba at 11 a.m. Sunday in Grace Episcopal Church’s award-winning loft sanctuary. They’ll discuss the powerful role family, faith and friendship play in shaping the tragedies and triumphs that often color the African…

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Kate Masur, Until Justice Be Done: America’s First Civil Rights Movement from the Revolution to Reconstruction

September 12 from 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
C-Span Stage, 731 S. Plymouth Ct
Chicago, IL 60605 United States
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Kate Masur is an associate professor of History at Northwestern University. She has written extensively on race and politics in the nineteenth-century United States, including in her first book, An Example for All the Land: Emancipation and the Struggle Over Equality in Washington, DC (2010). With Gregory P. Downs, she co-authored, for the US National Park Service, the National Historic Landmark Theme Study on the Era of Reconstruction (2017) and serves as co-editors of the Journal of the Civil War Era.

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Tamika Y. Nunley, At the Threshold of Liberty: Women, Slavery, and Shifting Identities in Washington D.C.

September 12 from 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
C-Span Stage, 731 S. Plymouth Ct
Chicago, IL 60605 United States
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Tamika Nunley is an associate professor of American history at Oberlin College. Her research and teaching interests include slavery, gender, 19th-century legal history, digital history, early America and the American Civil War. At Oberlin, she created the History Design Lab that allows students to develop scholarly projects that involve methodological approaches such as digital humanities, public history, creative nonfiction, and curatorial practices. Her book, At the Threshold of Liberty: Women, Slavery, and Self-making in Washington, D.C., which examines African American women’s strategies…

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Jonathan Foiles, (Mis)Diagnosed: How Bias Distorts Our Perception of Mental Health

September 12 from 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
C-Span Stage, 731 S. Plymouth Ct
Chicago, IL 60605 United States
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Jonathan Foiles is a lecturer at the University of Chicago Crown Family School of Social Work, Policy, and Practice. He is the author of "This City Is Killing Me: Community Trauma and Toxic Stress in Urban America" (Belt Publishing, 2019), and his writings on social justice and mental health have also appeared in Slate, Belt Magazine, The Chicago Review of Books, and Psychology Today.

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Jonathan Alter, His Very Best: Jimmy Carter, A Life in conversation with Rick Kogan

September 12 from 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
AWM/Joseph and Bessie Feinberg Foundation Stage, 47 W. Polk Street
Chicago, IL 60605 United States
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Jonathan Alter is an award-winning historian, columnist and documentary filmmaker. An MSNBC political analyst and former senior editor at Newsweek, he is the author of three New York Times bestsellers: The Center Holds: Obama and His Enemies; The Promise: President Obama, Year One; and The Defining Moment: FDR's Hundred Days and the Triumph of Hope.

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Roy Richard Grinker, Nobody’s Normal: How Culture Created the Stigma of Mental Illness

September 12 from 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
C-Span Stage, 731 S. Plymouth Ct
Chicago, IL 60605 United States
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Roy Richard Grinker, Ph.D. is Professor of Anthropology at George Washington University and Editor-in-chief of Anthropological Quarterly. He is the author of Nobody’s Normal: How Culture Created the Stigma of Mental Illness (NY: W.W. Norton, January 2021), among other books.

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Rick Perlstein, Reaganland: America’s Right Turn 1976-1980 in conversation with Micah Uetricht

September 12 from 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
C-Span Stage, 731 S. Plymouth Ct
Chicago, IL 60605 United States
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Eric S. Perlstein is an American historian and journalist who has garnered recognition for his chronicles of the 1960s and 1970s, and the American conservative movement. The author of five bestselling books, Perlstein received the 2001 Los Angeles Times Book Prize for his first book, Before the Storm: Barry Goldwater and the Unmaking of the American Consensus. Politico has dubbed him "a chronicler extraordinaire of modern conservatism."

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Carl Smith, Chicago’s Great Fire: The Destruction and Resurrection of an Iconic American City in conversation with Rick Kogan

September 12 from 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
C-Span Stage, 731 S. Plymouth Ct
Chicago, IL 60605 United States
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Carl Smith is Franklyn Bliss Snyder Professor of English and American Studies and Professor of History, Emeritus, at Northwestern University. His books include Chicago and the American Literary Imagination, 1880-1920; Urban Disorder and the Shape of Belief: The Great Chicago Fire, the Haymarket Bomb, and the Model Town of Pullman; The Plan of Chicago: Daniel Burnham and the Remaking of the American City; and City Water, City Life: Water and the Infrastructure of Ideas in Urbanizing Philadelphia, Boston, and Chicago. Born and raised and…

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Silvia Foti, The Nazi’s Granddaughter: How I Discovered My Grandfather Was a War Criminal

September 12 from 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
C-Span Stage, 731 S. Plymouth Ct
Chicago, IL 60605 United States
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Silvia Kučėnaitė Foti, MSJ, MAT, MFA, is a journalist, creative writer, teacher, and mother. Silvia holds Masters’ degrees in Journalism, Education, and Creative Nonfiction, has been a journalist for twenty years, has published two mystery novels, and has been a high school English teacher since 2007. With a Master’s in Journalism from Northwestern University, Silvia has extensive experience in writing nonfiction, and has written for a variety of publications, including the Chicago Tribune, Southtown Economist, Southwest News Herald, Crain’s Chicago Business,…

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Michael Harvey, Pulse

September 12 from 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Program Stage, 41 W Ida B. Wells Dr.
Chicago, 60605 United States
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Michael Harvey’s eight best-selling crime novels include the Michael Kelly series published by Knopf and Brighton, published by Ecco/HarperCollins. Film rights to Brighton were optioned by Graham King, producer of The Departed and The Town.  His 2018 novel Pulse was optioned by 21 Laps Entertainment, producer of the Amy Adams thriller Arrival and Netflix’s Stranger Things.  His ninth novel, Moonlight Heist, is in development as a streaming series with NBC/Universal. Michael is also the co-creator, producer and executive producer of A&E’s documentary forensic series, Cold Case Files. Michael was born in…

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